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Spiritual Gift of Compassion

Compassionate people are another of the serving gifts.These are people persons, quieter and less outgoing than those with a speaking gift of perceiver, teacher or administrator. The gift of compassion includes an almost supernatural sensitivity to the emotions of others. These people get upset when a baby bird falls out of its nest and is grabbed by the neighbors cat.
This unique sensitivity makes them apt to feel wounded or offended easily and they cry over everything. Correction and criticism that would not faze a teacher or administrator  will break the heart of a compassionate person. They live through their feelings. If they feel sad because they weather is rainy, even the excitement of an upcoming vacation probably won’t lift their spirits, because by golly, they feel sad and so it’s a sad day. They need to know that feelings lie, that we can’t base our decisions on how we feel because we’ll make some very bad decisions that way.

In the body of Christ, compassion people are the glue that helps us stick together. They reach out to hurting people, they notice when someone hasn’t been to church in a while and will call them to see if they’re okay. They can sense, in a room full of people, the one person who is feeling lonely and sad. Now, if their gift of compassion has been recognized, appreciated and encouraged, so they have sufficient sense of self worth, the compassion person will reach out to a hurting person with God’s love and comfort. If their gift has been ignored or ridiculed, or unappreciated as a child, they will not understand the importance of their gift and they won’t have the confidence to share it.

More than any other gift, compassion people need to be built up, encouraged and showered with love and hugs. They need to know they are NOT being overly-sensitive when they cry over every little thing. They certainly need to learn some perspective about over-reacting, but they should never be told their feelings are wrong.

Descriptive words:
Sensitive
Love everyone
Hurt when others are hurting
Exceptionally shy
Dislikes confrontation
Quiet
Poor self image
Kind
Needs lots of hugs and affirmations

About Susan Scott

Comments

  1. Tami Tillman says:

    I was taking a silly Facebook quiz, it said my spiritual gift was compassion, I was looking for the definition and to see if it was indeed a spiritual gift. A google search brought me here. I attempted to request your application on “how to know God’s will. It stated it was no longer available. Your explanations restored my belief that I may actually serve a purpose. I’m hoping that I could still receive your publication as budget is so tight I can’t afford such luxury’s

  2. Susan Scott says:

    Tami, Thank you so much for taking the time to let me know the link isn’t working. I appreciate that. While I work on fixing it, I’ve sent you an email with the direct link (plus another goodie 🙂 )

  3. Gail Nelson says:

    For years I always thought something was wrong with me. Why do I feel the need to help everybody? Why am I hurting for someone I hardly know? I don’t know how I stumbled upon this blog, but you don’t know how inspired and uplifted I am to know God thought enough of me to give me such a gift. Thank you for this info

  4. Susan Scott says:

    I am so glad you found some encouragement. The gift of compassion is probably the least valued and the most needed of all the gifts. People with a strong gift of compassion tend to be shy and easily overwhelmed in social situations because they pick up on the emotional undercurrents in a room. Other people don’t even notice the stream of emotion so they simply don’t understand the compassionate person’s need to get away from it. I hope you find ways to share your gift while at the same time respecting your unique need for extra space, serenity, and stress-free times to recharge.

  5. This is so helpful.

  6. Susan Scott says:

    So glad you liked it!

  7. Being a.man, this gift has been particularly difficult to understand. Seldom do you see a man getting emotional over the pain of others. Internally, I greatly appreciate this gift. I love feeling a connection with those who are hurting and being compelled to help when I can. Honestly, I wouldn’t want it any other way. I sometimes find it difficult when I see someone hurting and I don’t have the means to help them. Because I am ao emotional, I sometimes feel as though I am weak or too soft. For some reason I don’t do well in social situations or make friends easily.

  8. Susan Scott says:

    Of all the gifts, compassion is the one to be most desired. People with a high degree of compassion also have tremendous strength of character. They do not put themselves first, they have an innate, subconscious level of confidence which lets them put their own needs aside and care for the needs of others. I’m sure you are often amazed at the insensitivity of some people toward the needy and disadvantaged in society. It’s because they are too wrapped up in worrying about themselves. They don’t have the confidence that their needs will be taken care of so they feel they have to look out for number 1 first. You, however, are able to be unselfish in the presence of people who are hurting.
    The strongest, most confident and courageous man ever to live was also the most compassionate. Jesus could never be called wimpy; he strode into the holy temple in Jerusalem and trashed the market place in the courtyard. Yet he was tender and compassionate with the woman who was caught in adultery. It takes more strength to be compassionate because, as I said above, you have to be willing to make someone else’s needs more important than your own. You have a strength and courage so natural to your character that you don’t even recognize it, which is true of compassionate people in general.
    Unfortunately the gift of compassion is under-rated in today’s society. The people who get attention are attractive, athletic, outgoing, or intellectually gifted. Our culture treats those traits as more valuable, but that doesn’t mean they are. As a result, people with a high gift of compassion get ignored. If you don’t stand out as an athletic star, the prom king, the go-getter, or the trouble maker, you just don’t get much attention. A lifetime of being the quiet unnoticed one can lead compassionate people to feel less worthy then everyone else and thus uncomfortable in social situations. In fact, you are the most valuable person in the room because you can tell what’s going on below the surface. You sense the tensions or the person who pretends to be happy but who is really hurting inside.
    You can be the one person who will zero in on that hurting person and will give them sympathetic, understanding, and undivided, attention. The next time you are in a group, instead of trying to deal with the group as a whole, let your instincts guide you to one person whom you sense could use a friendly smile or a word of encouragement.

Trackbacks

  1. […] Compassion: Compassionate people are another of the serving gifts. That should tell you already these are people persons, quieter and less outgoing than those with a speaking gift of perceiver, teacher and administrator. The gift of compassion includes an almost supernatural sensitivity to the emotions of others. This unique sensitivity makes them apt to feel wounded or offended easily and they cry over everything. Correction and criticism that would not faze a teacher or administrator will break the heart of a compassionate person. They live through their feelings. If they feel sad because they weather is rainy, they feel sad and so it’s a sad day. […]

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